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Serbia Transnational Issues 2015

SOURCE: 2015 CIA WORLD FACTBOOK AND OTHER SOURCES











Serbia Transnational Issues 2015
SOURCE: 2015 CIA WORLD FACTBOOK AND OTHER SOURCES


Page last updated on June 20, 2014

Disputes - international:
Serbia with several other states protest the US and other states' recognition of Kosovo's declaration of its status as a sovereign and independent state in February 2008; ethnic Serbian municipalities along Kosovo's northern border challenge final status of Kosovo-Serbia boundary; several thousand NATO-led Kosovo Force peacekeepers under United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo authority continue to keep the peace within Kosovo between the ethnic Albanian majority and the Serb minority in Kosovo; Serbia delimited about half of the boundary with Bosnia and Herzegovina, but sections along the Drina River remain in dispute

Refugees and internally displaced persons:
refugees (country of origin): 41,762 (Croatia); 15,296 (Bosnia and Herzegovina) (2013)
IDPs: 97,300 (most are Kosovar Serbs, some are Roma, Ashkalis, and Egyptian (RAE); some RAE IDPs are unregistered) (2013)
stateless persons: 8,500 (includes stateless persons in Kosovo) (2012)

Illicit drugs:
transshipment point for Southwest Asian heroin moving to Western Europe on the Balkan route; economy vulnerable to money laundering


NOTE: 1) The information regarding Serbia on this page is re-published from the 2015 World Fact Book of the United States Central Intelligence Agency. No claims are made regarding the accuracy of Serbia Transnational Issues 2015 information contained here. All suggestions for corrections of any errors about Serbia Transnational Issues 2015 should be addressed to the CIA.
2) The rank that you see is the CIA reported rank, which may habe the following issues:
  a) They assign increasing rank number, alphabetically for countries with the same value of the ranked item, whereas we assign them the same rank.
  b) The CIA sometimes assignes counterintuitive ranks. For example, it assigns unemployment rates in increasing order, whereas we rank them in decreasing order






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